American Capitalism: A History - Cornell University

edX
Online

Free

Important information

  • Course
  • Online
  • When:
    Flexible
Description

Examine how economic development fueled the United States’ evolution from 13 backwater colonies to a global power.
With this course you earn while you learn, you gain recognized qualifications, job specific skills and knowledge and this helps you stand out in the job market.

Important information

Requirements: There is no formal prerequisite. 

Venues

Where and when

Starts Location
Flexible
Online

What you'll learn on the course

History
Economy
American Capitalism
Capitalism
Technological transformations

Course programme

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Perhaps no story is as essential to get right as the history of capitalism. Nearly all of our theories about promoting progress come from how we interpret the economic changes of the last 500 years. This past decade’s crises continue to remind us just how much capitalism changes, even as its basic features—wage labor, financial markets, private property, entrepreneurs—endure. While capitalism has a global history, the United States plays a special role in that story. This course will help you to understand how the United States became the world’s leading economic power, revealing essential lessons about what has been and what will be possible in capitalism’s on-going revolution.

What you'll learn

  • Describe the development of American capitalism as a historical process that emerged from political choices, business cultures, entrepreneurial decisions, and technological transformations.
  • Recognize and criticize the policy programs derived from different analyses of capitalism.
  • Describe how government policies contribute to market success and failure.
  • Exercise reading, writing, and analytical skills vital to historical interpretation.
  • Display a critical sense of how capitalism is not a static economic system but changes over time.

Additional information

Edward E. Baptist Edward Baptist is an associate professor in the Department of History at Cornell University. His scholarship is centered on the 19th-century United States and, more broadly, the creation of the modern world. One specific research focus is the massive growth of slavery in the United States between the American Revolution and the Civil War, an expansion that shaped the emergence of both American and global capitalism. He teaches a wide variety of courses on U.S. political history, the history of slavery, and, of course, the history of American capitalism. Baptist studied at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and received his PhD in history from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997.