Anger Mangement

ADL - Academy for Distance Learning
Distancia

£ 325 - (Rs 28,168)
+ VAT

Important information

  • Vocational qualification
  • Distance learning
  • When:
    Flexible
Description

Anger Management course online. Expand your knowledge, and learn to understand anger and explore techniques that can be useful in the management of anger. Like many other emotions, it is very difficult to give a precise definition of anger. In general terms, what we can say is that it is a strong reaction to an array of different situations such as being attacked, being restrained, losing one’s job, and so forth. You can probably think of many other instances which make you angry.
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Important information
Venues

Where and when

Starts Location
Flexible
Distance Learning

What you'll learn on the course

Mental Health
Anger Management
Behavioural Therapy
Conflict
Self Defence
Self-defence
Management
Appraisal
Voice
Construction
Supply
Dementia
Anger Counselling
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Depression
Personality Disorders
Assertiveness Training
IT Management
Construction Training
Psychology, Counselling, Research

Course programme

Lesson Structure: Anger Management BPSIII

There are 9 lessons:

Nature and Scope of Anger
Introduction
The autonomic nervous system
Anger and arousal
Galvanic skin resistance
Voice stress analyser
Polygraph
Degrees of arousal
Breaking personal rules
Self defence
Expression of anger
Counselling strategies
Empty chair technique
Recognising psychological arousal
Thought stopping
Relaxation exercises
Progressive muscle relaxation
Time out
Assertiveness training
Three steps in assertiveness training
Five stage assertiveness training interview
Mental blocks to assertiveness
Managing Anger with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
Cognitive behavioural therapy
Identifying antecendents
Assessment of anger
Beginning therapy
Teaching CBT
Inferences
Evaluations
Chaining
Disputing inferences and evaluations
Independance and blocks to change
Use of imageryEmotional insight Exposure
Termination
Working with anger problems in CBT
Problems with CBT for anger management
Anger Management Techniques for Violence
Introduction
Anger and violence
Appearance
Posture
Affect
Speech
Causes of violence
Cold violence
Hot violence
Reactive violence
Tips for dealing with a violent client
Strategies for violence prevention
Action after violence
Managing violence against others
Mental disorders and violence
Anger Management for People with Mental Health Issues
DSM dimensions to diagnose mental illness
Dementia
Dementia and anger
Supporting clients with dementia
Grief
Anxiety
Depression
Stages of grief
Tasks of mourning
Managing Anger in Children and Adolescents
Introduction
Toddlers
Temper tantrums
Older children and anger
Adolescence
Psychological changes in girls
Psychological changes in boys
Depression
Eating problems
Adults sharing anger
Anger Management for People with Special Difficulties
People with personality disorders
Psychopathology
Borderline personality disorders and treatment
Psychopath and treatment
Roid rage, symptoms and abuse
Anger Management Services
Counselling
Anger management clinics
Courses and workshops
Group and individual work
Conflict management
Conflict handling techniques
Life coaching
Setting up an anger management consultancy
Deciding on a Course of Action
PBL Project to create and present a plan of anger management to support an individual experiencing serious anger difficulties.
Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the academy and marked by your tutor and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading

Learning Goals: Anger Management BPS220

Discuss the nature and scope of anger including psychological and physiological manifestations.
Explain the biological, social and psychological causes of anger and the strategies used by counsellors to deal with the underlying causes in an effort to diffuse the build up of anger in people
Explain how anger problems can be addressed through the application of cognitive behavioural counselling
Discuss anger management techniques to diffuse violent outbursts and manage violence
Consider anger management issues for people with specific mental health issues.
Explain the causes of anger in children and adolescents, and review a wide range of techniques for addressing those issues.
Determine the nature and scope of anger management services in society.
Identify ways to support clients seeking anger management services
Evaluate a situation where anger is becoming a problem and determine an appropriate course to follow in response to the problem.
Extract from Course Lessons

Before we consider anger management, it is necessary to understand what anger actually is. Like many other emotions, it is very difficult to give a precise definition. In general terms, what we can say is that anger is a strong reaction to an array of different situations such as being attacked, being restrained, losing one’s job, and so forth. You can probably think of many other instances which make you angry. A definition of anger also usually includes physiological reactions to the angerprovoking stimuli. For instance, clenched fists, facial expressions, deep sighs, and so on are all possible physiological reactions. Many of these are autonomic nervous system responses, especially from the subdivision known as the sympathetic division which is associated with preparing the body for action. Indeed, anger can manifest in an attack response in many species. One of the difficulties in defining anger is that different researchers and authors might include other emotional reactions such as hatred, hostility and rage under their definition of anger. If you were to consult an English language dictionary you would probably find a definition along the lines of “a strong feeling caused by extreme displeasure”.

The Autonomic Nervous System
As mentioned above, the physiological manifestations of anger are part and parcel of understanding anger. To this end, we need to look more closely at what happens in the body when someone becomes angry. Specifically, we need to understand the role of the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is associated with the overall ‘state’ of the body. It is composed of unmyelinated nerve fibres which run from the spinal cord and base of the brain to internal and external sensory organs. The ANS is comprised of the sympathetic division which is involved with an action state, and the parasympathetic division which is concerned with a resting state. Activation of the sympathetic division is synonymous with arousal. During arousal, changes in the operation of the internal organs of the body take place which stimulate alertness and readiness for action.

For example, the spleen releases more red blood cells into the blood stream which increases the blood’s oxygen content. The heart beats faster thereby circulating the blood faster to muscles supplying sugars and oxygen, and it also replaces the used oxygen faster. Our breathing becomes deeper so that more oxygen is provided to the lungs. Sugar is metabolised more quickly by the digestive system to supply a ready source of energy, but foods in need of longer term digestion take longer to digest. Such changes are known as the ‘fight or flight’ response. This response enables an animal to either flee or stand and fight by equipping it with sufficient energy. In terms of evolution, the fight or flight response maximises an animal’s chances of survival in the face of danger. If an animal were to fight, then increased levels of blood clotting platelets released during the response will minimise bleeding. Endorphins released by the brain will minimise the sensation of pain.

Other responses include sweating to cool active muscles and dilated pupils to focus on external stimuli. The changes are stimulated by neural impulses from the sympathetic division of the ANS and are maintained by the endocrine system. The glands of the endocrine system release hormones and during arousal it is those hormones of the pituitary and adrenal glands which are involved.

Specifically, the pituitary gland releases glucocorticoids which are responsible for converting fats to glucose in the digestive system and for inhibiting the immune response until the fight or flight response has finished. The pituitary gland also releases ACTH (adrenocorticotrophic hormone) which stimulates the adrenal gland to secrete adrenalin. This enters the bloodstream where it maintains levels of muscular activity, a suitable blood supply to muscles, increased heart rate, blood pressure, and perspiration. The parasympathetic division of the ANS is not quite the opposite of the sympathetic division but its activity does counteract many of those of the sympathetic division.

For example, rather than dilate the pupils its actions constrict them and rather than inhibit longer term digestive processes it stimulates them. The parasympathetic division of the ANS is concerned with stimulating the body’s restorative processes through promoting tissue repair and storing fats and sugars for when they are needed. When the intense activity of the sympathetic division declines, the parasympathetic division becomes active. If you were to become angry this would stimulate the sympathetic division of your ANS, as you calmed down the parasympathetic division of your ANS would activate.

This course is accredited by ACCPH and allows you to join as a professional member after completion. Membership allows you to add the letters MACCPH after your name (post-nominals).Lesson Structure: Anger Management BPSIII

There are 9 lessons:

Nature and Scope of Anger
Introduction
The autonomic nervous system
Anger and arousal
Galvanic skin resistance
Voice stress analyser
Polygraph
Degrees of arousal
Difficulties of arousal theories
Theories of emotion
James Lange theory
Cannon Bard theory
Schachter's theory
Lazarus's appraisal theory
Weiner's attribution
Averill's social construction theory
Facial feedback theory
Managing Anger with Counselling
Causes of anger
Frustration
Breaking personal rules
Self defence
Expression of anger
Counselling strategies
Empty chair technique
Recognising psychological arousal
Thought stopping
Relaxation exercises
Progressive muscle relaxation
Time out
Assertiveness training
Three steps in assertiveness training
Five stage assertiveness training interview
Mental blocks to assertiveness
Managing Anger with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
Cognitive behavioural therapy
Identifying antecendents
Assessment of anger
Beginning therapy
Teaching CBT
Inferences
Evaluations
Chaining
Disputing inferences and evaluations
Independance and blocks to change
Use of imageryEmotional insight Exposure
Termination
Working with anger problems in CBT
Problems with CBT for anger management
Anger Management Techniques for Violence
Introduction
Anger and violence
Appearance
Posture
Affect
Speech
Causes of violence
Cold violence
Hot violence
Reactive violence
Tips for dealing with a violent client
Strategies for violence prevention
Action after violence
Managing violence against others
Eating problems
Adults sharing anger
Anger Management for People with Special Difficulties
People with personality disorders
Psychopathology
Borderline personality disorders and treatment
Psychopath and treatment
Roid rage, symptoms and abuse
Anger Management Services
Counselling
Anger management clinics
Courses and workshops
Group and individual work
Conflict management
Conflict handling techniques
Life coaching
Setting up an anger management consultancy
Deciding on a Course of Action
PBL Project to create and present a plan of anger management to support an individual experiencing serious anger difficulties.
Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the academy and marked by your tutor and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading

Learning Goals: Anger Management BPS220

Discuss the nature and scope of anger including psychological and physiological manifestations.
Explain the biological, social and psychological causes of anger and the strategies used by counsellors to deal with the underlying causes in an effort to diffuse the build up of anger in people
Explain how anger problems can be addressed through the application of cognitive behavioural counselling
Discuss anger management techniques to diffuse violent outbursts and manage violence
Consider anger management issues for people with specific mental health issues.
Explain the causes of anger in children and adolescents, and review a wide range of techniques for addressing those issues.
Determine the nature and scope of anger management services in society.
Identify ways to support clients seeking anger management services
Evaluate a situation where anger is becoming a problem and determine an appropriate course to follow in response to the problem.
Extract from Course Lessons

Before we consider anger management, it is necessary to understand what anger actually is. Like many other emotions, it is very difficult to give a precise definition. In general terms, what we can say is that anger is a strong reaction to an array of different situations such as being attacked, being restrained, losing one’s job, and so forth. You can probably think of many other instances which make you angry. A definition of anger also usually includes physiological reactions to the angerprovoking stimuli. For instance, clenched fists, facial expressions, deep sighs, and so on are all possible physiological reactions. Many of these are autonomic nervous system responses, especially from the subdivision known as the sympathetic division which is associated with preparing the body for action. Indeed, anger can manifest in an attack response in many species. One of the difficulties in defining anger is that different researchers and authors might include other emotional reactions such as hatred, hostility and rage under their definition of anger. If you were to consult an English language dictionary you would probably find a definition along the lines of “a strong feeling caused by extreme displeasure”.

The Autonomic Nervous System
As mentioned above, the physiological manifestations of anger are part and parcel of understanding anger. To this end, we need to look more closely at what happens in the body when someone becomes angry. Specifically, we need to understand the role of the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is associated with the overall ‘state’ of the body. It is composed of unmyelinated nerve fibres which run from the spinal cord and base of the brain to internal and external sensory organs. The ANS is comprised of the sympathetic division which is involved with an action state, and the parasympathetic division which is concerned with a resting state. Activation of the sympathetic division is synonymous with arousal. During arousal, changes in the operation of the internal organs of the body take place which stimulate alertness and readiness for action.

For example, the spleen releases more red blood cells into the blood stream which increases the blood’s oxygen content. The heart beats faster thereby circulating the blood faster to muscles supplying sugars and oxygen, and it also replaces the used oxygen faster. Our breathing becomes deeper so that more oxygen is provided to the lungs. Sugar is metabolised more quickly by the digestive system to supply a ready source of energy, but foods in need of longer term digestion take longer to digest. Such changes are known as the ‘fight or flight’ response. This response enables an animal to either flee or stand and fight by equipping it with sufficient energy. In terms of evolution, the fight or flight response maximises an animal’s chances of survival in the face of danger. If an animal were to fight, then increased levels of blood clotting platelets released during the response will minimise bleeding. Endorphins released by the brain will minimise the sensation of pain.

Other responses include sweating to cool active muscles and dilated pupils to focus on external stimuli. The changes are stimulated by neural impulses from the sympathetic division of the ANS and are maintained by the endocrine system. The glands of the endocrine system release hormones and during arousal it is those hormones of the pituitary and adrenal glands which are involved.

Specifically, the pituitary gland releases glucocorticoids which are responsible for converting fats to glucose in the digestive system and for inhibiting the immune response until the fight or flight response has finished. The pituitary gland also releases ACTH (adrenocorticotrophic hormone) which stimulates the adrenal gland to secrete adrenalin. This enters the bloodstream where it maintains levels of muscular activity, a suitable blood supply to muscles, increased heart rate, blood pressure, and perspiration. The parasympathetic division of the ANS is not quite the opposite of the sympathetic division but its activity does counteract many of those of the sympathetic division.

For example, rather than dilate the pupils its actions constrict them and rather than inhibit longer term digestive processes it stimulates them. The parasympathetic division of the ANS is concerned with stimulating the body’s restorative processes through promoting tissue repair and storing fats and sugars for when they are needed. When the intense activity of the sympathetic division declines, the parasympathetic division becomes active. If you were to become angry this would stimulate the sympathetic division of your ANS, as you calmed down the parasympathetic division of your ANS would activate.

This course is accredited by ACCPH and allows you to join as a professional member after completion. Membership allows you to add the letters MACCPH after your name (post-nominals).Lesson Structure: Anger Management BPSIII

There are 9 lessons:

Nature and Scope of Anger
Introduction
The autonomic nervous system
Anger and arousal
Galvanic skin resistance
Voice stress analyser
Polygraph
Degrees of arousal
Difficulties of arousal theories
Theories of emotion
James Lange theory
Cannon Bard theory
Schachter's theory
Lazarus's appraisal theory
Weiner's attribution
Averill's social construction theory
Facial feedback theory
Managing Anger with Counselling
Causes of anger
Frustration
Breaking personal rules
Self defence
Expression of anger
Counselling...

Additional information

Counselling and Support Work
ASIQUAL