Food for Thought - McGill

edX
Online

Free

Important information

  • Course
  • Online
  • When:
    Flexible
Description

A course that offers a scientific framework for understanding food and its impact on health and society from past to present.
With this course you earn while you learn, you gain recognized qualifications, job specific skills and knowledge and this helps you stand out in the job market.

Important information

Requirements: None

Venues

Where and when

Starts Location
Flexible
Online

What you'll learn on the course

Health
Society
Healthy Diet
Food
Issues

Course programme

Eating well and understanding the nuances of food has become a complicated and often confusing experience. Virtually every day brings news about some “miracle food” that we should be consuming or some "poison" we should be avoiding. One day it's tomatoes to prevent cancer, then flaxseed against heart disease or soybeans for menopause. At the same time, we are warned about trans fats, genetically modified foods, aspartame and MSG. Dietary supplements are often touted as the key to health or a factor in morbidity. According to some, dairy products are indispensable while others urge us to avoid them. The same goes for meat, wheat and soy; the list goes on. This course will shed light on the molecules that constitute our macro and micronutrients and will attempt to clarify a number of the food issues using the most relevant, up-to-date science available. Other topics to be presented will include the diet-cancer relationship, the link between diet and cardiovascular disease, food-borne illnesses, food additives and weight control.

Additional information

Ariel Fenster Ariel Fenster is well known as an exceptional promoter of science with an extensive program, developed over three decades. In that period, he has given well over 800 public presentations in English and in French across North America and Overseas. He appears regularly on TV and radio to discuss health, environmental and technology issues and has presented numerous science segments for children's television. His contributions to teaching, and to the popularization of science, have been recognized by numerous awards. Among them: the McNeil Medal for the Public Awareness of Science from the Royal Society of Canada (1992, inaugural award) and the Michael Smith Award for the Promotion of Science in Canada from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (2005).