Language Revival: Securing the Future of Endangered Languages - University of Adelaide



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Learn how the world’s endangered languages are revived and why this process is critical to preserving cultural identity.With this course you earn while you learn, you gain recognized qualifications, job specific skills and knowledge and this helps you stand out in the job market.

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What you'll learn on the course


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Language is an integral part of society. Wherever we come from, the words we use and the way in which we use them are fundamental to our cultural identity. In today’s increasingly globalised world, however, ‘linguicide’ – the loss of a language – is becoming all too common. But there is hope. The language revival movement has emerged as an important and effective response, and this course will introduce you to its key principles and techniques.   After discussing powerful answers to the question of why languages should be revived, we’ll investigate how. Far more than just a simple process of recovering literacy and lost letters, language revival involves a deep and complex engagement with history, human rights, identity and wellbeing. You will also learn what’s being done around the world right now, and how effective these techniques have been.

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Ghil’ad Zuckermann Professor Ghil’ad Zuckermann is a leading expert in ‘revivalistics’ and Chair of Linguistics and Endangered Languages at the University of Adelaide. His study of language, culture and identity has taken him across the world, he is highly acclaimed in the media, and he has been instrumental in the revival of many languages in Australia and abroad. Rob Amery Dr Rob Amery has been working with Aboriginal languages since 1980, when he worked as a nurse at Balgo (Kimberley, Western Australia) with Kukatja-speaking people. He has taught linguistics and literacy to speakers of a range of languages, including many South Australian languages.